JEB logo

Journal of Environmental Biology

pISSN: 0254-8704 ; eISSN: 2394-0379 ; CODEN: JEBIDP

About Journal
    Home
    Editor in Chief
    Editorial Board
    Reviewer Panel
    Publication Policies
    Guidelines for Editors
    Guidelines for Reviewers
    Abstracting and Indexing
    Subscription and Payments
    Contact Journal
 
Read Journal
    Current Issue
    Journal Archives
 
For Authors
    Guidelines for Authors
    Terms and Conditions
    Fees and Payments
    Track Paper Status
 
Announcements
    JEB Awards
 

Google Search the Journal web-site:


    Abstract - Issue Sep 2011, 32 (5)                                     Back


nstantaneous and historical temperature effects on a-pinene

Active pharmaceutical ingredient (api) from an estuarine fungus,

Microdochium nivale (Fr.)

 

Author Details

 

S.H. Bhosale

Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune - 411 008, India

K. B. Patil

 

Botany Dept., Shivaji Univ, Kolhapur - 416 105, India

P.S. Parameswaran

Bio-organic Group, Chemical Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography,

Dona-Paula, Goa - 403 004, India

C.G. Naik

Bio-organic Group, Chemical Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography,

Dona-Paula, Goa - 403 004, India

T.G. Jagtap

(Corresponding author)

Biological Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography,

Dona-Paula, Goa - 403 004, India

e-mail: tanaji@nio.org

 

 

 

 

Publication Data

Paper received:

23 March 2010

 

Revised received:

08 October 2010

 

Re-revised received:

10 December 2010

 

Accepted:

08 January 2011

 

Abstract

Various marine habitats sustain variety of bio-sources of ecological and biotech potentials. Pharmaceutical potential compound Cyclosporine A was reported from marine fungus Microdochium nivale associated with Porteresia coarctata, a marine salt marsh grass from mangrove environment distributed along the Central West Coast (CWC) of India. This study involves association of M.? nivale with P. coarctata plant, fermentation conditions, purification of Cyclosporine A, chemical characterization etc. Its antifungal inhibition and MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration) against Aspergillus strains (A. niger, A. japonicus, A. fresenii), yeasts and dermatophytes (Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. tonsurans, T. violaceum, Microsporium gypsum and Fusarium sp.) were evaluated. However, the MIC against A. japonicus, C. neoformans, Candida sp. and T. tonsurans were confirmed to be as low as 12.5-25 mg disc-1. The antifungal properties of Cyclosporine A against Aspergillus species, yeast and dermatophytes revealed that Cyclosporine A would be a potential compound for life threatening diseases caused by above fungi in both human and animals. Furthermore, we have reported herewith another source of Cyclosporin A derived from filamentous fungus, M.? nivale. occurring in marine environment.

 

Key words

Microdochium nivale, Cyclosporine A, Antifungal, Estuarine environment

 

Copyright ? 2011 Triveni Enterprises. All rights reserved. No part of the Journal can be reproduced in any form without prior permission. Responsibility regarding the authenticity of the data, and the acceptability of the conclusions enforced or derived, rest completely with the author(s).